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4G Eclipse GS/SE Specific 2.4L I4 (4G69) Specific Forum


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Old May 5th, 2020, 10:29 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Upgraded Radiator worth it?

Is an upgraded radiator a good early mod to install to a 2.4l eclipse? Iv heard these cars are pretty bad at cooling in general so is this something I should look into before other mods?
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Old May 5th, 2020, 11:52 AM   #2 (permalink)
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It's engine bay heat people are talking about usually, and the fix for that is venting out the fenders or hood. My suggestion is to take it to the track first, see if you have overheating issues, and go from there.

I'm running 3x stock power, and haven't had overheating issues yet. But it's circuit and drag racing I have my car for, not AutoX, which has much lower speeds, so less airflow to cool the rad. That being said, I also have a huge intercooler in front of my rad that blocks flow, and still it isn't overheating.
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Old May 5th, 2020, 01:44 PM   #3 (permalink)
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The heat under the hood is a big problem due to the pre cats in the exhaust manifolds

Once I fixed that the extra heat seemed to go away
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Old May 5th, 2020, 04:00 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabertooth^2 View Post
It's engine bay heat people are talking about usually, and the fix for that is venting out the fenders or hood. My suggestion is to take it to the track first, see if you have overheating issues, and go from there.

I'm running 3x stock power, and haven't had overheating issues yet. But it's circuit and drag racing I have my car for, not AutoX, which has much lower speeds, so less airflow to cool the rad. That being said, I also have a huge intercooler in front of my rad that blocks flow, and still it isn't overheating.
Saber tooth i need your expertise haha. I was looking into adding the injen cai next week. Are there a lot of reports of people sucking water in bad conditions? If so I would probably end up going short ram because weather in PA is so bipolar.
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Old May 5th, 2020, 04:08 PM   #5 (permalink)
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If you have a manual, clutch in when going through Noah's flood. If auto, throw it in neutral if you think you're gonna be underwater with the filter.

As long as you're not on the throttle, or the engine isn't being forced to turn by the weight of the car, there is so little pumping force at idle RPM that water won't get into your engine.

As for a wet filter in general causing stalling, yeah, that'll happen sometimes with a filter low to the ground. Water can splash up onto it, and then if that water mist comes up to the MAF sensor, the MAF will go to 5v, max out fueling, and you may stall. It's a non purposeful fail safe for intaking water. If water hits the MAF, the engine stalls. If it stalls.


That being said, I did have to drive through water up to my doors to get off a flooding street before, and did it with a cold air intake. It worked because the bumper of my car created a wake, pushing the water away. Most people grossly overstate how affected CAI are by water. Just be smart with it, and you'll be fine. I even kept mine on during the winters I drove this car
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Old May 5th, 2020, 06:28 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Dude I drive year round in Ohio with the DC Sports CAI
Snow doesn’t bother me, it’s the flooding that u have to worry about, just don’t be one of those idiots who tries to drive through a largely flooded road where u can’t see the bottom and you’ll be fine

Only once during a huge flash flood watch storm was a worried about water logging it, I think it got pretty wet and my tires kept spinning out on slick roads
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Old May 5th, 2020, 11:33 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Besides Injen makes hydroshields. My DC Sports CAI has it and havent had any issues so far. I checked the filter 6 months later and it looked like new.
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Old May 6th, 2020, 12:06 PM   #8 (permalink)
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You guys are always more than enough help. Thank you!
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Old May 6th, 2020, 03:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Welcome! Glad to help. 😁
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Old May 7th, 2020, 05:13 AM   #10 (permalink)
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I have a DC Sports CAI and I've never had an issue with water. I do have a fluid filter bag thing on it (idk what it's called lmao) and I've drove through some REALLY heavy rain storms. Always nervous, but as long as you're not literally submerging the filter end of the CAI, you'll be fine. I've heard the Short Ram Intakes aren't the best because of residual engine heat eating into power, since it wouldn't be a cold air intake anymore, but a hot air intake. Also, the Short Ram such on the 4 cylinder I've also heard.

The DC Sports CAI is really easy to install and I did it at 2 am in my gravel drive way at my last house.
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Old May 7th, 2020, 05:34 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Heatwrapping is a must for SRI if you ask me. I did it to my RRE headers and have driven hard around my area to test the wrapping, engine bay is way cooler than before. I also removed the weather strip if that's what it's called. Rubber strip on the plastic part where wipers sit. Open the hood and you'll see it. Heat is pushed out through there giving a similar effect as hood spacers. Not sure if as much but there is a difference for me therefore im sure a SRI would benefit from it as well. A TB spacer also works wonders.
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Old May 7th, 2020, 05:47 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Heatwrapping is a must for SRI if you ask me. I did it to my RRE headers and have driven hard around my area to test the wrapping, engine bay is way cooler than before. I also removed the weather strip if that's what it's called. Rubber strip on the plastic part where wipers sit. Open the hood and you'll see it. Heat is pushed out through there giving a similar effect as hood spacers. Not sure if as much but there is a difference for me therefore im sure a SRI would benefit from it as well. A TB spacer also works wonders.
That weather strip keeps water out of your engine bay, I do not recommend removing this

This seal failed on my dads trailblazer and rusted the spark plugs into the head, when removing one it snapped off
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Old May 7th, 2020, 01:23 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Bad news. You actually created an inlet, not an outlet. Air hits the windshield and is the highest or second highest pressure point on a car. Outlets are at the front of the hood, inlets are at the windshield
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Old May 7th, 2020, 05:31 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Bad news. You actually created an inlet, not an outlet. Air hits the windshield and is the highest or second highest pressure point on a car. Outlets are at the front of the hood, inlets are at the windshield
Yeah ever seen those old NASCARs with the air intakes coming from the windshield? They figured out air actually bounced down from the windshield towards the hood, at least some of it does
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Old May 7th, 2020, 08:16 PM   #15 (permalink)
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It's not about bouncing down or flow. It's about pressure. The air velocity at the windshield is lower, and is a high pressure zone. It doesn't flow back to the front of the car unless there's a low pressure zone to flow to inside the boundary layer.
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Old May 7th, 2020, 08:55 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Well if it is a problem i plan to correct it very soon. I still have the strip in my car.

Edit: Done. Just put it bk on. Easy to do it except the last clips on each end. Those are harder to lift to wiggle the rubber around them.

Last edited by Sparda D'Mon; May 8th, 2020 at 09:33 AM.
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Old May 8th, 2020, 09:43 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Heatwrapping is a must for SRI if you ask me. I did it to my RRE headers and have driven hard around my area to test the wrapping, engine bay is way cooler than before. I also removed the weather strip if that's what it's called. Rubber strip on the plastic part where wipers sit. Open the hood and you'll see it. Heat is pushed out through there giving a similar effect as hood spacers. Not sure if as much but there is a difference for me therefore im sure a SRI would benefit from it as well. A TB spacer also works wonders.
What is a heat wrap specifically? Where do I buy that also? Local Autozone?
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Old May 8th, 2020, 09:58 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparda D'Mon View Post
Heatwrapping is a must for SRI if you ask me. I did it to my RRE headers and have driven hard around my area to test the wrapping, engine bay is way cooler than before. I also removed the weather strip if that's what it's called. Rubber strip on the plastic part where wipers sit. Open the hood and you'll see it. Heat is pushed out through there giving a similar effect as hood spacers. Not sure if as much but there is a difference for me therefore im sure a SRI would benefit from it as well. A TB spacer also works wonders.
What is a heat wrap specifically? Where do I buy that also? Local Autozone?
Beware heat wrap usually retains moisture and can promote rusting
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Old May 8th, 2020, 12:52 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Heat wrap is specifically an insulating wrap that goes around piping to prevent radiant heat off it, as well as provides a high surface area to dissipate the heat through thermal induction, making it cooler to touch than the surface below it, while also insulating.

It's generally a weave of fiberglass, but others such as titanium fiber also exist.


And yes, using heat wrap, you must realize the pipe is now an expendable part. It does hold moisture, and promotes rust. That's the advantage of thermal coatings, is that they reduce risk of rust vs bare metal.

That said. I just have 2000f generic heat paint on my manifold, and have no regrets or concerns. I didn't see a reason to go through the effort NA, don't see a reason now either.
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Old May 8th, 2020, 01:40 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Heat wrap is specifically an insulating wrap that goes around piping to prevent radiant heat off it, as well as provides a high surface area to dissipate the heat through thermal induction, making it cooler to touch than the surface below it, while also insulating.

It's generally a weave of fiberglass, but others such as titanium fiber also exist.


And yes, using heat wrap, you must realize the pipe is now an expendable part. It does hold moisture, and promotes rust. That's the advantage of thermal coatings, is that they reduce risk of rust vs bare metal.

That said. I just have 2000f generic heat paint on my manifold, and have no regrets or concerns. I didn't see a reason to go through the effort NA, don't see a reason now either.
So heat paint one ups heat wrap? Where can I purchase the paint? I'd rather go to a brick and mortar store if thats doable with the very long shipping times recently.
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Old May 9th, 2020, 09:16 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Most auto part stores have high intensity heat paint, mostly engine paint.
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Old May 9th, 2020, 09:47 AM   #22 (permalink)
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No. Heat resistant paint is just paint that doesn't flake from being hot, or get burned off. It has no effective thermal insulation properties.

My point was that it's worth so little NA, or even at my boost level, that it wasn't concerning.
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