Mitsubishi Eclipse 4G Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I started lookin at coilovers to purchase and have some questions
I seen some have different amounts of adjustments like some say 15 and some say 30
Do you need to by other stuff along with it I was reading and seen something about extensions
The ones I'm looking at are the Meagan street series or bc br type. I drive on the road honestly I don't think I'll race it but would those be good for on the street? I know im gonna feel all the bumps but I'm tryna lower it and I don't want lowering springs. thanks tho for any input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
So I started lookin at coilovers to purchase and have some questions
I seen some have different amounts of adjustments like some say 15 and some say 30
Do you need to by other stuff along with it I was reading and seen something about extensions
The ones I'm looking at are the Meagan street series or bc br type. I drive on the road honestly I don't think I'll race it but would those be good for on the street? I know im gonna feel all the bumps but I'm tryna lower it and I don't want lowering springs. thanks tho for any input
I bought BC Racing BR coil overs with extreme low kit and the damping adjustment extensions. I also got custom spring rates. I used the spring rates Meagan Racing uses.

My opinion:

- The Megan Racing spring rate was probably too stiff for street use, but Im able to soften the damping to make it a little more tolerable. Still pretty rough though.

- The adjustment extension for the rear can be made with stuff from a hardware store. I think there is DIY tutorial somewhere on the site. The extension makes it much, much easier to adjust. Otherwise you have to pull your trunk interior apart or take the strut out to adjust the rear shocks. Either make your own or get them from BC Racing.

- Depending how low you want to go, the extreme low kit could be for you. I think Im 2+ Inches down in the rear and 1.5+ in the front? Cant remember exactly.

- I dont know if anyone will argue it, but I think BC Racing is higher quality and they advertise the struts are designed to be rebuilt. Thats what sold me.

Ill add a pic of my car to see how low I am.
Car Wheel Tire Vehicle Land vehicle

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive lighting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
+2 on BC BR extreme low, I just installed mine over the weekend. Buy new endlinks for sure, I had to cut every single one of mine.
 

·
Basically Stock
2009 GS Turbo. 2007 Mid Engine GT
Joined
·
7,972 Posts
BC with digressive shocks are fantastic. They can be stiff enough not to have body roll, but soft enough to go down a washboard dirt road at 60mph, on the same settings (rate changes based on speed of shock movement). Below that, price wise, I'd suggest KSport. At least in the past, KSport were rebadged BC racing. BC sells white box to other companies to rebrand. KSport come from the same factory as BC. BC owns the factory... There's my connection. The KSport seem to last just fine, people like them, and they save you a bunch of money over basic BC


Spring rate wise, all of them are too stiff if you're not in a GT with about 500lbs downforce or running super heavy wheels. Front spring frequency at 8k was something like 2.5hz on a stock GT manual otherwise (body and wheel weight). That's well into dedicated track car territory. Something like 6k front 3k rear wouldn't be bad, but I pulled those numbers out of my ass just now and there's definitely room to optimize.

Setup wise, extreme low are cool, but suspension geometry gets absolutely ruined past about 2.5" drop. The camber and toe just go nuts with compression past then


For buying them, talk to Jason at Auto City Imports. I believe he still does a Club4g deal
 

·
Basically Stock
2009 GS Turbo. 2007 Mid Engine GT
Joined
·
7,972 Posts
GT is better on the default spring rates than GS on the defaults, but it's still set up for a car making quite a bit of downforce, not a street setup. Most just run the defaults and are happy anyway, although run a less comfortable less grippy setup as a payoff for not doing the math.

1.5-2" you're good.

Digressive valving is a dynamic variable shock valve flow rate. On fast movements such as hitting a bump, the valves allow fast flow, for quick suspension movement. That absorbs the bump, and keeps the wheel in full contact with the road. On slow movements, such as squat, nose dive, and body roll, the valves in the shocks allow only very slow flow rates. That reduces the body movement in all those cases, keeping the car flatter and in better control. These are what I run on my GT, and what you'll typically find in supercars as it gives road comfort, while not giving up performance. They're both more, and less hardcore than traditional fixed valve designs. They feel better and give better performance, but don't give that "full blown track car" feeling in normal use (less hardcore). They're typically better than single valved in all purposes (entry level BC) but in pure track use, the dual adjustable valved style (separate compression and extension damping) with external reservoirs (heat) is usually better, especially in off road racing. For you, digressive would be best for your use, but may not be best for the cost (about 50% more than a KSport setup costs without making you go 50% faster).


And for your other question about the extenders, they're little rods that extend the rear shock adjustment knobs so you don't need to go through the interior paneling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are bc br series digressive? And I feel stupid for asking this but what is extreme low like a smaller strut? And also what are the spring rates to go with cause I don't really understand that part and are should I get the swift springs are they worth it?
 

·
Basically Stock
2009 GS Turbo. 2007 Mid Engine GT
Joined
·
7,972 Posts
No they aren't. BC lists another series as digressive.

Here's BR series, the cheap ones which you may as well buy KSport

Here's DS, digressive
ACI actually sells them a bit cheaper than BC


And here's the KSport, only $100 off from the BC entry level now. I guess they've gone up significantly (they were around $850 last I looked)
 

·
Basically Stock
2009 GS Turbo. 2007 Mid Engine GT
Joined
·
7,972 Posts
Extreme low uses a shorter strut body, reducing the length max/min by ~3". Not worthwhile for your goal of a 2" drop max.

Swift springs use less coils to give the same spring rate of a regular one. Generally the spring rate is a little more consistent, and the ride quality over large bumps a bit better. They're also lighter, and tend to react a little quicker due to lower inertia, and so ride smoother ever so slightly.

As for higher spring rate than default, definitely not. Default rate will honestly feel best when you have passengers in the car. If you want to go lower rates, you'll have to get quite a bit of math involved with measurements, and start weighing your parts to find suspension geometry ratios, and then take spring data and weights to figure out frequencies... Else you can quickly end up with an undrivable terrible setup by mistake
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top