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I don’t think I wanna spend money on A whole new exhaust so may be the cheapest options would be best
 

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A custom made exhaust at a local shop is the cheapest and best option generally. They'll default to aluminized mild steel, which gives the deepest tone and best heat retention. 2.75" is best for a street driven GT, combined with short tube headers, and a tune.
How much do you think it will be here in WA?
 

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resonators usually cost extra but give a smoother and more even tone, my last exhaust cost $800 (Y pipe to new cat to muffler) and was all stainless except for the muffler which is a partly mild steel custom unit from the previous system (ceramic coated mild steel). Also in my opnion, custom exhausts (for the 8g Galant and 3g Eclipse) sound better than off the shelf units, but that may come down to the quality of the muffler, however, I have never heard a 4g Eclipse exhaust I didn't like
 

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A custom made exhaust at a local shop is the cheapest and best option generally. They'll default to aluminized mild steel, which gives the deepest tone and best heat retention. 2.75" is best for a street driven GT, combined with short tube headers, and a tune.
Though the shops may default to aluminized mild steel, would that be the best choice for someone like me in Calgary, AB where there is a lot of snow and in turn, road salt?

I definitely want that deep tone, but would you suggest I go with a different material due to those road conditions, or would I be fine?
 

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Though the shops may default to aluminized mild steel, would that be the best choice for someone like me in Calgary, AB where there is a lot of snow and in turn, road salt?

I definitely want that deep tone, but would you suggest I go with a different material due to those road conditions, or would I be fine?
The welds will rust out long before the piping does. Remember, your OEM exhaust isn't stainless either. I'm in Ontario, I've got a Quebec 2007 GT as well (the salt capital) and the exhaust on that was fine too.

If the welds are done well, you could see 15-20 years out of an aluminized mild steel exhaust. If the welds are done poorly, they could leak after a season on stainless or mild. Stainless I would worry more, as trusting an exhaust shop to be using the proper rod alloy and Tig welding it together rather than MIG is quite a leap. MIG on stainless won't last very long at all.
 

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The welds will rust out long before the piping does. Remember, your OEM exhaust isn't stainless either. I'm in Ontario, I've got a Quebec 2007 GT as well (the salt capital) and the exhaust on that was fine too.

If the welds are done well, you could see 15-20 years out of an aluminized mild steel exhaust. If the welds are done poorly, they could leak after a season on stainless or mild. Stainless I would worry more, as trusting an exhaust shop to be using the proper rod alloy and Tig welding it together rather than MIG is quite a leap. MIG on stainless won't last very long at all.
Great thanks. Would it be possible for me hit up the shop and ask if they could do 2.75" from the cat back (retaining the cat)? since the default is what, 2.33"? or would the welds just solve that difference in diameter? In other words, how is the change in diameter adopted?
 

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GT is 2.25" stock.

Change in diameter can be accommodated by expanding the stock pipe, compressing the new pipe, an adapter piece, or a nasty gap filled by weld.

And you can change size wherever you want, physically. Just try to avoid necking down in any sudden way.

What you may gain is a bit of top end power at a small loss of bottom end, as you'd be effectively shortening your exhaust by going to 2.75" after the cat. Avoid a straight through design muffler, as you won't have the exhaust velocity to take advantage of scavenging (most up top will be lost to becoming pressure instead). You'll definitely gain a deeper sound with a baffled muffler on that design, certainly deeper than stock.
 

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GT is 2.25" stock.

Change in diameter can be accommodated by expanding the stock pipe, compressing the new pipe, an adapter piece, or a nasty gap filled by weld.

And you can change size wherever you want, physically. Just try to avoid necking down in any sudden way.

What you may gain is a bit of top end power at a small loss of bottom end, as you'd be effectively shortening your exhaust by going to 2.75" after the cat. Avoid a straight through design muffler, as you won't have the exhaust velocity to take advantage of scavenging (most up top will be lost to becoming pressure instead). You'll definitely gain a deeper sound with a baffled muffler on that design, certainly deeper than stock.
Oh ok so even if I changed my cat-back piping to 2.5 or something, I could still have them use a muffler with a 2.25" inlet diameter?

Also what exactly is a baffled muffler? I just searched for it but I couldn't find a thing on baffled ones but I have seen you recommend them in a few posts so I would like to know more about them.

Is this a baffle type muffler?:
 

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You COULD go to a 2.25" muffler, but that's suddenly necking it down, which I strongly don't suggest.

As for baffled muffler, it's a blanket term that covers any design of muffler to use baffle plates. Eg, a Super 10 doesn't really use chambers like a conventional muffler would, and doesn't use them like a turbo muffler would, but does still use baffle plates that disrupt and reflect the sound waves carried in your exhaust pipe. It's not a straight through design. I like to talk more in terms of the physical aspects of parts than marketing. For some it makes it easier, for others I can lose them. Eg, someone earlier today that had no idea what NO2 was but knew the brand NOS.

Baffle plate:
"a plate or mechanical device designed to restrain or regulate the flow of a fluid, the emission of light or sound, or the distribution of sound"
 

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You COULD go to a 2.25" muffler, but that's suddenly necking it down, which I strongly don't suggest.

As for baffled muffler, it's a blanket term that covers any design of muffler to use baffle plates. Eg, a Super 10 doesn't really use chambers like a conventional muffler would, and doesn't use them like a turbo muffler would, but does still use baffle plates that disrupt and reflect the sound waves carried in your exhaust pipe. It's not a straight through design. I like to talk more in terms of the physical aspects of parts than marketing. For some it makes it easier, for others I can lose them. Eg, someone earlier today that had no idea what NO2 was but knew the brand NOS.

Baffle plate:
"a plate or mechanical device designed to restrain or regulate the flow of a fluid, the emission of light or sound, or the distribution of sound"
Oh i see. But how can I identify a muffler as baffled when looking that the page? None of them seem to like to use that word at all.
Additionally, I did a little research and I found that apparently baffles are a victim of increased back pressure, which you mentioned is also the case for straight-through mufflers. In this case, why are the baffled ones better than straight-through if they have that same issue?
 

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As soon as you see "back pressure" being suggested, or a flat statement that a muffler in specific will cause it on your setup, walk away.

I was on the topic of the Bernoulli principal. Your exhaust will be under high pressure, then drop in velocity as it goes into the larger pipe diameter after the cat, resulting in a loss of scavenging. It's not an optimal system.

And whatever muffler you're looking at, you can usually find a cutout image showing the inside. But if it's a bullet style, just walk away. It won't have baffles.
 

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As soon as you see "back pressure" being suggested, or a flat statement that a muffler in specific will cause it on your setup, walk away.

I was on the topic of the Bernoulli principal. Your exhaust will be under high pressure, then drop in velocity as it goes into the larger pipe diameter after the cat, resulting in a loss of scavenging. It's not an optimal system.

And whatever muffler you're looking at, you can usually find a cutout image showing the inside. But if it's a bullet style, just walk away. It won't have baffles.
Oh, no, where I saw back pressure being suggested was on an article about mufflers referring to all baffle mufflers, which is why I was confused as to why both designs (baffle and straight-through) would have the same issue.
Could you possibly find me an example of a muffler you think would be appropriate for what I am looking for so I can know sort of what to be looking at?
 
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